fixyourwritinghabits:

luftangrepp:

This really is every representation debate in sci-fi and fantasy ever.

"We can’t have people of color in this story - its in the middle ages."

Imagining dragons and elves and hobbits is fine, but imagining a world not inhabited entirely by white people? That would be unrealistic.

Oh dear gods, this was one of my favorite episodes of one of my favorite shows! I’m having feels now.
Reminders about antiheroes

the-right-writing:

  • They don’t count as antiheroes if there are zero in-text clues that their behavior is immoral. It just looks like you share their opinions.
  • They don’t count as antiheroes if their actions never have any negative consequences. The whole point of immoral actions is that people get hurt.
  • Please don’t write what you think of as a hero and then slap the antihero label on them when you get criticism for their actions.

fishingboatproceeds:

dcpubliclibrary:

lauriehalseanderson:

They put my thoughts about censorship on a LIBRARY in Washington, DC!!!!

Absolute career highlight!! Thank you, kind librarians!

Thanks for the inspiration lauriehalseanderson!

You can find even more awesome art inside the building in celebration of Banned Books Week and the freedom to read, express and create as part of UNCENSORED: The Art Exhibition.

Laurie’s words three stories tall. Awesome.

dickmark:

OKAY SO ALMOST 2 MONTHS AGO OUR ENGLISH TEACHER FORCED US TO ENTER A POETRY CONTEST AND I WAS ABOUT TO ENTER A POEM WHEN IT TRIED TO FORCE ME TO GIVE IT A TITLE SO IN A FIT OF RAGE I WROTE A NEW POEM COMPLAINING ABOUT THE TITLE REQUIREMENT

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AND TODAY I WENT TO CHECK MY EMAIL AND I??????

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YOU ARE LITERALLY PUBLISHING AN INSULT TO YOUR OWN RULES BUT OKAY I GUESS IF GETTING TALKED DOWN TO TURNS YOU ON SOMEHOW AND I GET PUBLISHED I’VE GOT NO COMPLAINTS HERE?

(Source: autisticalfred)

writingwithcolor:

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We discussed the issue of describing People of Color by means of food in Part I of this guide, which brought rise to even more questions, mostly along the lines of “So, if food’s not an option, what can I use?” Well, I was just getting to that!

This final portion focuses on describing skin tone, with photo and passage examples provided throughout. I hope to cover everything from the use of straight-forward description to the more creatively-inclined, keeping in mind the questions we’ve received on this topic.

So let’s get to it.

S T A N D A R D  D E S C R I P T I O N

B a s i c  C o l o r s

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Pictured above: Black, Brown, Beige, White, Pink.

"She had brown skin.”

  • This is a perfectly fine description that, while not providing the most detail, works well and will never become cliché.
  • Describing characters’ skin as simply brown or beige works on its own, though it’s not particularly telling just from the range in brown alone.

C o m p l e x  C o l o r s

These are more rarely used words that actually “mean” their color. Some of these have multiple meanings, so you’ll want to look into those to determine what other associations a word might have.

Read More

magicalartilove:

kathudsonart:

Some of my favorite books from my collection. Hope you enjoy and find an artist you enjoy!

Posting it on this blog because illustrators of children’s books are so often overlooked, and deserve the same praise than any other type of artist.

Anonymous: Hello! I've been thinking about writing a story that includes magic and weaponry (I have the characters and scenes kind of floating about in my head) but when I try to put it in a genre, it seems that it fits in medieval fantasy, and I'm not too familiar writing such a genre. What should I do?

thewritingcafe:

You only have to worry about genre when you’re trying to write a smaller, more specific genre (such as steampunk) or when you’re trying to sell your story.

Don’t worry what genre it is right now. If you do want to write a medieval fantasy, you’ll have to research the time period and culture you’re writing about (even if you make up a place you’ll have to research some stuff) and read a lot of medieval fantasy.

However, here is a list of fantasy genres (keep in mind that many fantasy novels can fit into more than one category):

  • Alternate World: A setting that is not our world, but may be similar. This can include a character traveling to another world or a setting that is simply an alternate version of ours.
  • Arabian: Fantasy that is based in or on the Middle East and North Africa. This also includes folk tales and epic poems, which make up the majority of this genre.
  • Arthurian: Set in Camelot (most of the time) and deals with Arthurian mythology and legends.
  • Celtic: Fantasy that is based on the Celtic people and culture, most often post La Tene culture.
  • Christian: This genre has Christian themes and elements alongside fantasy elements.
  • Classical: Based on Roman and Greek myths. Sometimes it includes Kemetism.
  • Contemporary/Modern: This genre takes place in modern society in which paranormal and magical creatures live among us. An example would be the Harry Potter series.
  • Dark: This genre combines fantasy and horror elements. The tone or feel of dark fantasy is often gloomy, bleak, and gothic.
  • Epic: This genre is long and, as the name says, epic. Epic is similar to high fantasy, but has more importance, meaning, or depth. Epic fantasy is most often in a medieval setting.
  • Gaslamp: Also known as gaslight, this genre has a Victorian or Edwardian setting.
  • Gunpowder: Gunpowder crosses epic or high fantasy with “rifles and railroads”, but the technology remains realistic unlike the similar genre of steampunk. It’s like putting elves on a pirate ship or putting werewolves in the Wild West.
  • Heroic: Centers on one or more heroes who start out as humble, unlikely heroes thrown into a plot that challenges them.
  • High: This is considered the “classic” fantasy genre. High fantasy contains the general fantasy elements and is set in a fictional world. It is often heroic or epic as well.
  • Historical: The setting in this genre is any time period within our world that has fantasy elements added.
  • Medieval: Typically set in Europe during the early to late middle ages.
  • Mythic: Fantasy involving or based on myths, folklore, and fairy tales.
  • Paranormal/Supernatural: Involves supernatural and paranormal creatures as the source of fantasy, such as werewolves, vampires, and ghosts. Romance is often present.
  • Portal: Involves a portal, doorway, or other entryway that leads the protagonist from the “normal world” to the “magical world”.
  • Quest: As the name suggests, the protagonist in this genre sets out on a quest. The protagonist most frequently searches for an object of importance and returns home with it or with a prize.
  • Science Fantasy: A genre that combines science fiction and fantasy. An example is Star Wars.
  • Sword and Sorcery: Settings in which the characters use swords and engage in action-packed plots. Magic is also an element, as is romance. These can be set in many time periods.
  • Sword and Soul: Similar to Sword and Sorcery and heroic fantasy, but African-inspired. However, the genre is spreading to other subgenres of fantasy.
  • Urban: Has a modern or urban setting in which magic and paranormal creatures exist, often in secret. It also has elements of horror.
  • Wuxia: A genre in which the protagonist learns a martial art and follows a code. This genre is popular in Chinese speaking areas.

nprbooks:

FACT: There is such a thing as rainbow bookshelf wallpaper. In case you were wondering.

-Nicole

(h/t Buzzfeed Books)

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CS